The Games That Weren't

by Bitmap Books

$69.95 AUD

Shipping within Australia from $12.95

Now larger than both the movie and music industries combined, the video game industry has provided more than 40 glorious years of interactive entertainment across a plethora of hardware platforms, including consoles, computers and handheld devices. We truly are spoilt for choice when it comes to picking something to play, and that dizzying degree of choice is growing by the day. 

Even so, there are a great many video games which have sadly never seen the light of day for a variety of reasons – and many of these have incredible mysteries and gripping tales attached to them, both unsolved and untold. The Games That Weren't aims to lift the lid on these stories and give these unknown titles a chance to shine – even if we weren't able to actually play them as their developers intended.

Giving an illustrated snapshot of a wide range of unreleased games between the years of 1975 and 2015 and covering systems from the Atari 2600 right up to the Sony PlayStation 4, The Games That Weren't is the biggest book Bitmap Books has ever created and includes titles across a variety of arcade, home computer, console, handheld and mobile platforms. Years in the making, it's packed to bursting point with exclusive content, in-depth interviews and much more besides.

Many of these lost classics are expanded upon in exceptional detail, with those involved with their design and development sharing their untold stories and recollections – as well as shedding some light on intriguing mysteries along the way. Assets and screenshots – some of which have never been seen until now – help illustrate the narratives, and in the case of games for which no images exist, there are specially-created artist's impressions which give a tantalising visual interpretation of what could have been.

Covering more than 80 games – including Star Fox 2, Green Lantern and SimMars – across a 40-year span and packed with content such as five specially-created 'Hardware That Wasn't' blueprint pieces and interviews with industry legends such as David Crane, Jeff Minter, Matthew Smith, Dan Malone, Eugene Jarvis, Dylan Cuthbert, Andrew and Philip Oliver, Geoff Crammond, Scott Adams, Jon Hare and many more, The Games That Weren't showcases and pays tribute to well-known and not so well-known unreleased titles, as well as games you might never have heard of – until now. As if that wasn't enough, the book has been produced to the traditional high standard Bitmap Books readers have come to expect, with eye-catching fluorescent colours and high-quality binding on superb paper stock.

While the games industry has much to celebrate, there's something uniquely captivating in looking at titles that never made it to the finish line – and The Games That Weren't will hopefully keep the memory of these failed masterpieces alive.

Specifications:

- 644 pages

- 170mm x 210mm

- Lithographic print

- Hardback

- Sewn binding

- Coloured bookmark ribbon

- Special fluorescent ink throughout

- Shrink wrapped

Detailed features cover games such as
Sebring (Arcade), The Last Ninja (Atari 800/130XE, Amstrad CPC, Atari ST, Commodore Amiga, Tandy Colour Computer 3 and ZX Spectrum 48K), Solar Jetman (Amstrad CPC, Atari ST, Commodore 64, Commodore Amiga 500 and ZX Spectrum 128K), Chips Challenge (Nintendo Entertainment System), Green Lantern (Atari ST, Commodore Amiga, SEGA Mega Drive and Super Nintendo), Rolling Thunder (Atari Lynx), Virtual Tank (Nintendo Virtual Boy), Deathwatch(Atari Jaguar), Star Fox 2 (Super Nintendo), Ridge Racer (PC), SimMars (Apple Macintosh and PC), Half-Life (Nintendo GameCube and SEGA Dreamcast), Stunt Car Racer Pro (Microsoft Xbox, PC and Sony PlayStation 2), Eye of the Moon(Apple iOS) plus many more...

Customer Reviews
4.8 Based on 4 Reviews
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RM
08 Oct 2020
Russell M.
Australia Australia
Really wish some of these games existed

Such a great quality book delivered quickly and effortlessy The book itself is full of games that you wish were released at the time. And of course some that should have stayed cancelled. If you are fan of good ol classics from retro computers and consoles, you will love this book. Bitmap books are all such great quality

WS
21 Sep 2020
Warwick S.
Australia Australia
A great little tome of stories from (mostly) failed games.

First of all, full credit to the materials and manufacturing of this title. The pictures are printed on thick picture quality paper. It really brings out their vibrancy and does the tidbits of the failed games justice. Physically this book is a joy to own, contents entirely aside. Frank has done a great job at structure in this title. The index at the begging is a great starting point to cherry pick where to read. You can find titles you never new existed or those you wished you'd seen some to fruition. The content for the games is great too, especially the little 'Available to Play' marker at the beginning of each chapter. It gives you a bit of hope before you read the chapter. The interviews and back stories are great. It is really interesting to read developers comments about systems / games / developers they worked with and on. The stories told really give back the 'human' element to the failed projects. It cements that it really is not all corporate after all. My main criticism is that there are very few (if any) sources. It would have been great to have some directions as to materials that are referenced or other works that they are derived from. Often things are said by an interviewee that come across as if they have no basis other than in passing conversation. Overall however, a great book to have on the coffee table or on a shelf as a somewhat historical reference. I'm still in awe of the materials used though.

M
19 Sep 2020
Michael
Australia Australia
Fantastic book

I am about half way into the book. It is fantastic. The stories on how many games never made it to production or release are amazing. I recommend it to anyone who is a game developer or a game enthusiast.